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21May/12Off

Hitachi launches all-in-one data center service

IDG News Service - Japanese conglomerate Hitachi on Monday launched a new data center business that includes everything from planning to construction to IT support.

Hitachi said its new "GNEXT Facility & IT Management Service" will cover consulting on environmental and security issues, procurement and installation of power, cooling and security systems, and ongoing hardware maintenance. It will expand to include outsourcing services for software engineers and support for clearing regulatory hurdles and certifications.

The company targets $1.25 billion in orders from the new business by the fiscal year that ends in March 2016, or about 10% of total revenue, based on its forecast for the recently ended fiscal year.

As Japanese companies gear up to build and support the growing trend for cloud-based services that require large data centers, Hitachi has opted to leverage its broad collection of subsidiaries. The company produces everything from nuclear power plants to bulldozers to mobile phones.

The company will offer standardized rack layouts for existing facilities, as well as all-in-one container data centers. It said the goal is to offer an all-in-one outsourcing service for clients that want to host their own data centers on site.

Hitachi said it will initially focus on Japan, China and the ASEAN countries, which include Singapore, Indonesia and Vietnam, looking to grow the business with local regional partners.

Japanese hardware and consulting firms are increasingly focusing on server farms and "big data," which refers to the huge sets of information generated by websites, social networks, and physical networks of sensors in the field. Last month Fujitsu, which also offers servers for data centers, announced a new suite of software for the sector, saying it will eventually target over $1 billion in annual sales.

Cloudera, a U.S. provider of open-source software based on the Hadoop platform, has announced that it opened a subsidiary in the country, partnering with local IT giant and data center operator NTT Data.

Source: Computer World

21May/12Off

Is the Philippines Ready to Become An Economic Leader in the Region?

Is the Philippines destined to become an Asian economic growth leader, matching China, India and Vietnam?

Yes, according to a set of statistics in the draft document “Asean, the PRC and the Great Transformation?” put out by the Asian Development Bank at its recent annual meeting in Manila.

The ADB is forecasting the Philippines’ annual average gross domestic product growth of 7 percent between now and 2030. This is in the same projected growth league as China, India and Vietnam, and it is way ahead of Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia.

Is this anything more than wishful thinking on the part of the Asian Development Bank Institute, the ADB’s Tokyo-based research arm, or could the Philippines become the first populous developing country to use the services sector as a basis for an economic takeoff?

The investment climate in the Philippines has improved significantly since the advent of the Aquino administration two years ago. Its commitment to attack corruption, smuggling, tax evasion, inflexible labor laws, cozy insider deals which profited well-connected businesses but deterred competition and foreign investment has been noted at home and abroad.

There is a chance that four more years of the Aquino administration could permanently raise standards of governance and put in place some of the physical and educational infrastructure needed to raise the long-term growth rate. But government revenues remain low and some is spent on subsidies to keep the poorest in school, leaving very little for roads and ports. Public-private partnerships are in the works but must overcome a history of regulation and political interference.

It will take time to build a base from which an industrial economy can grow and take workers from very low value-added services and farming to labor-intensive manufacturing.

The Philippines’ failure to develop its manufacturing sector, which accounts for 21 percent of GDP compared with 34 percent in Thailand, has long been a curse which kept the nation poor and forced workers overseas. But now this weakness may be a strength as global markets for low-technology manufacturers are glutted by a combination of over-investment in China and the almost boundless availability of labor in South Asia. It is to the Philippines’ advantage that most of its foreign exchange now comes from remittances ($20 billion a year and rising) and business process outsourcing, now at $13 billion. These dwarf physical exports, led by electronics which are around $35 billion. Both are more stable income sources than manufactures or resources.

BPO, which requires educated people but little financial capital, is creating a significant class of educated lower-middle income salary earners who have spawned building and consumption booms. Though their numbers — about 450,000 directly employed by the industry — are relatively small in the context of a nation of 90 million, and BPO success has scant impact on the poorly educated masses, the middle-income class is expanding and, with it, an appreciation of the value of education and of expectations of standards of government.

Even the birth rate is falling and families are taking to the use of contraception, so while other East Asian nations face the challenge of rapidly aging populations, the Philippines will be less burdened than in the past by a rapid increase.

Tourism is also beginning to acquire some momentum, helped by the expansion of domestic and international air services. Though still far behind, it has become a favorite destination for South Koreans.

Even the Scarborough Shoal dispute could be a benefit, raising the country’s international profile and strengthening its often fragile sense of national identity.

Eventually all the gains from services and remittances will have to be reflected in the creation of manufacturing industries, but the infrastructure can be laid from the existing income streams.

The ADB projection of 7 percent a year until 2030 looks optimistic. But the tables may finally be turning as the Philippines begins to catch up with the likes of Thailand and Indonesia.

Asia Sentinel

Philip Bowring, a former editor of The Far Eastern Economic Review, is a founder and consulting editor of Asia Sentinel.

Source: The Jakarta Globe

15Sep/11Off

Software industry challenged by rising human resource costs

HCM CITY — Rising costs for human resources have weakened Viet Nam's chief competitive advantage in the software industry.

In the past, cheap labour was seen as the country's chief competitive advantage in making international-standard software, but that advantage is declining.

The pool of employees for the software industry is still rather small, and language skills, particularly in English and Japanese, for writing software are limited.

Viet Nam, however, still maintains a balance between expenditures and human resource skills, compared to India and China.

"But this balance could collapse if the country doesn't control inflation," Nguyen Hung Cuong, software development director at Harvey Nash, told Dau tu (Vietnam Investment Review) newspaper.

"Vietnamese-made software for the Japanese market is only 1-2 per cent of what China sells to Japan," Cuong added.

The small pool of skilled employees is another problem as no company is able to employ several hundred software programmers in a few months.

"This means that there is no chance for Vietnamese companies to process big software projects," Cuong added.

Although Viet Nam is seen as a location that can produce international software, many projects remain on paper because of these limitations that the country faces.

Meanwhile, turnover from the software processing industry in Viet Nam was US$1 billion, while total turnover for the sector was $244 billion worldwide last year. It is expected yo reach $268 billion this year.

From: VietnamNews

5Aug/11Off

Nokia opens factory in Vietnam

The world's leading mobile phone maker Nokia plans to open a handset factory in Vietnam next year in order to take advantage of growing markets in Asia.

Nokia said it planned an initial investment of around 200 million euros ($275 million) "with further sizeable investments thereafter". The factory in Vietnam is part of its effort to reach the billions of people who do not own a mobile device or have access to the internet.

Nokia factory in Vietnam

Source: Channel News Asia

30Mar/11Off

The ‘Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0′ provider is not registered on the local machine

Today I got this error "The 'Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0' provider is not registered on the local machine"  when running my ASP.NET web based application on my new laptop with Windows 7 64 bit. It was a form that allows user to upload excel file, then I read the data from excel file into data table object. It used to work in my old laptop, but not in my new one :( .

I have googled around for this issue, have found solution for it. So I took a note here for people who might face same problem as me.

Steps to fix this problem

  • Open the IIS Manager
  • Click on Application Pools
  • Select your web application pool
  • Click on the link "Set Application Pool Defaults" on the right hand side
  • In General area, turn on "enable 32-bit applications"
Microsoft Jet OLEDB provider is not registered

Microsoft Jet OLEDB provider is not registered

30Mar/11Off

MS SQL Tips Collection

Alternative way to get the table's row count

To get the total row count in a table, we usually use the following select statement:

SELECT count(*) FROM table_name

This query performs full table scan to get the row count. You can check it by setting SET SHOWPLAN ON for SQL Server 6.5 or SET SHOWPLAN_TEXT ON for SQL Server 7.0/2000. So, if the table is very big, it can take a lot of time.

There is another way to determine the total row count in a table. You can use thesysindexes system table for this purpose. There is ROWS column in the sysindexes table. This column contains the total row count for each table in your database. So, you can use the following select statement instead of above one:

SELECT rows FROM sysindexes WHERE id = OBJECT_ID('table_name') AND indid < 2

Select multiple columns from a subquery

In MSSQL 2005 and higher you may use this syntax:

SELECT SalesOrderID, Foo
FROM (
  SELECT A.SalesOrderId, B.Foo,
         ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY B.SalesOrderId ORDER BY B.whatever) AS rn
  FROM A
  JOIN B ON B.SalesOrderID = A.SalesOrderID
  WHERE A.Date BETWEEN '2000-1-4' AND '2010-1-4'
) i
WHERE rn

Drop all tables, stored procedures, views, etc.. by sql query I have collected from stackoverflow

/* Drop all non-system stored procs */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'P' AND category = 0 ORDER BY [name])

WHILE @name is not null
BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = 'DROP PROCEDURE [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +']'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT 'Dropped Procedure: ' + @name
    SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'P' AND category = 0 AND [name] > @name ORDER BY [name])
END
GO

/* Drop all views */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'V' AND category = 0 ORDER BY [name])

WHILE @name IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = 'DROP VIEW [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +']'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT 'Dropped View: ' + @name
    SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'V' AND category = 0 AND [name] > @name ORDER BY [name])
END
GO

/* Drop all functions */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] IN (N'FN', N'IF', N'TF', N'FS', N'FT') AND category = 0 ORDER BY [name])

WHILE @name IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = 'DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +']'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT 'Dropped Function: ' + @name
    SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] IN (N'FN', N'IF', N'TF', N'FS', N'FT') AND category = 0 AND [name] > @name ORDER BY [name])
END
GO

/* Drop all Foreign Key constraints */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @constraint VARCHAR(254)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' ORDER BY TABLE_NAME)

WHILE @name is not null
BEGIN
    SELECT @constraint = (SELECT TOP 1 CONSTRAINT_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' AND TABLE_NAME = @name ORDER BY CONSTRAINT_NAME)
    WHILE @constraint IS NOT NULL
    BEGIN
        SELECT @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +'] DROP CONSTRAINT ' + RTRIM(@constraint)
        EXEC (@SQL)
        PRINT 'Dropped FK Constraint: ' + @constraint + ' on ' + @name
        SELECT @constraint = (SELECT TOP 1 CONSTRAINT_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' AND CONSTRAINT_NAME <> @constraint AND TABLE_NAME = @name ORDER BY CONSTRAINT_NAME)
    END
SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' ORDER BY TABLE_NAME)
END
GO

/* Drop all Primary Key constraints */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @constraint VARCHAR(254)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY' ORDER BY TABLE_NAME)

WHILE @name IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT @constraint = (SELECT TOP 1 CONSTRAINT_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY' AND TABLE_NAME = @name ORDER BY CONSTRAINT_NAME)
    WHILE @constraint is not null
    BEGIN
        SELECT @SQL = 'ALTER TABLE [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +'] DROP CONSTRAINT ' + RTRIM(@constraint)
        EXEC (@SQL)
        PRINT 'Dropped PK Constraint: ' + @constraint + ' on ' + @name
        SELECT @constraint = (SELECT TOP 1 CONSTRAINT_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY' AND CONSTRAINT_NAME <> @constraint AND TABLE_NAME = @name ORDER BY CONSTRAINT_NAME)
    END
SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE constraint_catalog=DB_NAME() AND CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY' ORDER BY TABLE_NAME)
END
GO

/* Drop all tables */
DECLARE @name VARCHAR(128)
DECLARE @SQL VARCHAR(254)

SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'U' AND category = 0 ORDER BY [name])

WHILE @name IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT @SQL = 'DROP TABLE [dbo].[' + RTRIM(@name) +']'
    EXEC (@SQL)
    PRINT 'Dropped Table: ' + @name
    SELECT @name = (SELECT TOP 1 [name] FROM sysobjects WHERE [type] = 'U' AND category = 0 AND [name] > @name ORDER BY [name])
END
GO
An alternative way to drop all tables is by using EXEC sp_MSforeachtable @command1 = "DROP TABLE ?" - this is a hidden SP in sql server

13Nov/10Off

Vietnam’s Growing Role in Outsourcing

Some of the biggest names in technology are turning to the Asian country for top-notch game design and software development

When Microsoft's video game unit began looking to offshore some work in 2002, Vietnam was hardly an obvious choice. But after a fact-finding team returned from an Asia-wide tour including stops in India, China, and South Korea, a small outfit named Glass Egg Digital in Ho Chi Minh City was a top contender. After successfully completing a pilot project designing 3-D racing cars used on the Forza Motorsport game installed in every Xbox console, Glass Egg's relationship with Microsoft (MSFT) has steadily grown.

Today, Glass Egg Digital designs most of the 330 different models in Forza Motorsport 2. Not only do the digital Lamborghinis, Maseratis, and Mercedes look and handle on screen exactly like the real thing, but equally important, they look just as convincing as crumpled wrecks after collisions.

Next up, Microsoft is planning to contract out the considerably more demanding task of creating the tracks and cities through which its cars race. "Today we work on a massive scale [with Glass Egg]," says Nick Dimitrov, senior business manager at Microsoft Game Studios. "We have pretty much put them through the grinder on QA [quality assurance] compliance, and we couldn't be happier."
Selling to the Masters

He's not the only one singing Glass Egg's praises. "They have done some fantastic stuff for us," says Brian Woodhouse, executive producer at Bizarre Creations in Liverpool which outsourced the creation of digital gas masks, telecom towers, and statues that get shot up in a gun-lovers' game called CLUB under development for Sega.

Glass Egg's client roster now includes Electronic Arts (ERTS), Sony Computer Entertainment Europe (SNE), Codemasters, and Atari (ATAR). Founded in 1995 by Vietnamese-American Phil Tran as a 2-D production studio, Digital Glass Egg has seen revenues grow 50% in the past two years. The company declined to give exact numbers but says sales this year will be just under $5 million.

Glass Egg is by no means the only Vietnamese company carving out a niche in software outsourcing. Crosstown rival Alive Interactive, also with a U.S. founder, has excelled in car design, while software developer TMA Solutions, founded by Canadian-Vietnamese Nguyen Huu Le does work for Nortel (NT), Comsys, and Alcatel-Lucent (ALU).

Intel Planning Plant

Homegrown Vietnamese companies are gaining momentum too. The country's largest outsourcing outfit is a division of Hanoi-based IT company FPT Corp., which just garnered a $36.5 million investment from private equity firm Texas Pacific and Intel Capital.

Further proof of Vietnam's potential are the ringing endorsements the country has received from some of IT's biggest names. In March, Intel (INTC) Chairman Craig Barrett visited Vietnam to unveil plans for a $600 million chip testing and assembly plant (see BusinessWeek.com, 3/13/06, "Good Morning, Vietnam"). Intel subsequently bumped up the figure to $1 billion.

In April, Bill Gates was greeted like a rock star by some 7,000 students at Hanoi University of Technology where he talked about his vision of IT in Vietnam. Nonetheless, the country faces some big obstacles if it is to become an IT outsourcing hot spot. Internet connections can be painfully slow since there is no fiber-optic broadband network. The staff at Glass Egg often stay up half the night in order to upload and download files.

Lost on the Map

Another drawback is the lack of fluent English speakers, though clients say this problem is minimal as most communication is via e-mail. Helping balance out these deficiencies are the country's low wages—programmers earn about one-tenth what computer programmers make in the U.S.—a young and highly motivated workforce, and low staff turnover rates of about 5%.

With software and IT exports of just $70 million last year, tiny Vietnam is never going to eclipse India, which logged $17.7 billion in high-tech shipments in 2007. Indeed, for many multinationals looking to outsource this kind of work, the country doesn't even figure on the map.

"One disadvantage of being here is that some people think we work in rice paddies and little grass huts," says Glass Egg Chief Operating Officer Charles Speyer. Nothing could be further from the truth. Glass Egg's 140 employees toil in state-of-the-art facilities just a mile from Ho Chi Minh City's international airport in E-Town, Vietnam's first high-rise dedicated to high-tech clients.

Mastering the Background Arts

The company's big challenge will be keeping its edge over China. "Ultimately China will beat us on cost," says Steve Reid, a Glass Egg business development manager. "If we want to be in business in five years, we have to move up the value chain." For his company, that means mastering the technically more demanding task of environment design.

Reid says its first attempt, working with Electronic Arts to create an imaginary Middle Eastern background for EA's Battlefield 2 war game was a huge learning experience for both companies. Turning out sleek driving machines is a snap, says Reid, compared to the challenge of portraying rusted tanks, bombed-out mosques, and water-stained walls.

(by Frederik Balfour on Business Week)

13Aug/10Off

How Can A Company Benefit From Outsource Product Development?

The latest web application development has caught the attention of the entire business world. An enterprise prefers outsource development to boost the bottom line, save time and manage the cost effectively.
Web Application Development Get Lot of Attention
The latest web application development has caught the attention of the entire business world. An enterprise prefers outsource development to boost the bottom line, save time and manage the cost effectively. There are various reasons cited for the outsourcing the product, but one should know that when does it really make sense?
When does outsourcing make sense?
Outsourcing product development is needed when the company needs expertise and it doesn’t have full time involvement.
When the company doesn’t seem to have enough resource to complete the work.
When it’s difficult to manage the internal teams to do few or all projects.
When there is a desire of incorporating new approach in the product.
When the product development company want to find and evaluate the capability of the outsourcing firm.
When the company wants to know the methods and protocols of the outsourcing firm.
Reasons for outsourcing product development
To acquire expertise
The most likely reason for outsourcing to the product development services is to acquire expertise which is currently not available with the company. Expertise lacks because of any non-core activity or due to rapid rise in the demand which a company cannot fulfill. In both of the situation outsourcing is a wonderful way to plug the demand for expertise.
To build the additional resource
One of the clear reasons for outsourcing is to add the number of resource to the development team to end the project. When the internal team get pressurized and burdened they lead ineffectual product development thus additional resource are needed to support the project and the team.
To minimize the development costs
One of relevant reason for outsourcing is to minimize the overall development cost of the products. Outsourcing is a cost-effective measure and it cuts overall cost of employees such as taxes, benefits and salary, overall expenditure of desks, computers, hardware and software tools, supporting costs, risk costs etc.